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Total number of comments: 6 (since 2013-11-28 16:37:50)

Earl Killian

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  • Combining Wind Power And Electric Vehicles In Denmark (Video)
    • The California Plug-in Electric Vehicle Owner Survey found that 44% of EV owners had PV systems, and an additional 17% were planning on installing PV, so many of the EVs out there today are being fueled with sunshine.

      Wind is an even better match to EVs than PV though, so Denmark has the right idea. In many places in the world, wind generates best at night, which is when EVs are parked and plugged in. The ability of EVs to charge when the wind blows and pause (or even feedback power to the grid via V2G) when it doesn't can be helpful in smoothing out the intermittent nature of wind power.

    • What is the point of asserting something such as you did without offering any data and justification to back it up?

      There are journal articles giving detailed analysis of how this would work, such as the work at U. Delaware. I suggest you actually check out what is going on this area before posting unjustified blog comments.

      Also, one can buy a car today that can be charged to add 150 miles of range in 30 minutes. Technology has a way of improving with time, so there is no reason not to expect faster charge times and greater range.

  • NYPD Attack on OWS and the End of the First Amendment
    • The bill of rights is not toothless for corporations: they recently got the right to spend unlimited amounts on politics. The bill of rights is not toothless for gun owners: they recently got handgun control laws struck down in DC. It has teeth for Republican issues.

  • A Hot Wet Thousand Years and 10 Green Energy Stories to Avert it
    • Simple price competitiveness of renewable power is not sufficient to avert disaster. Each year the existing infrastructure adds 2 ppm of CO2 to the atmosphere. If new renewable power is cheaper than new fossil power then no new fossil power will be built, but it is not going to shutdown any existing fossil power, so that 2 ppm will just keep on adding year after year, reaching 450 ppm in just 30 years.

      If you want to shutdown coal power with market forces alone, then you new the cost of new renewable power to fall below the O&M cost of an existing coal power plant. That is a very tall order indeed.

      In reality it will take the governments to buy up fossil power plants to shut them down (since it is a golden rule in democracies that investors cannot ever lose money). How likely is that?

  • 6 Million Pakistanis need Immediate Aid as 1/3 of Country is Submerged
    • This is what results from global warming of 0.7C. Next imagine 2.0C. Finally imagine 4.0C. And remember, 0.7C is the warming we have gotten with greenhouse pollution (e.g. CO2, CH4, soot, etc.) despite the masking of aerosols. Without the aerosols, the current warming would be over 2.4C, according to Ramanathan and Feng. The CO2 will last centuries, but the aerosols will last only a couple of years, so when we finally pull the plug on the coal plants, the temperature will soar much faster than the gradual build up we've seen so far. By the time we do pull the plug, the final temperature increase will be a lot more than 2.4C. What is happening in Pakistan is merely a mild version of what is to come.

  • Portugal's Green Energy Revolution and the true Cost of Gas, Coal and Oil
    • Portugal's electricity may twice that in the US, but since they use 36% of the kWh per capita, they pay lower bills than we do. The US uses about twice as much power per capita as other first world industrial nations (Germany, Japan, France, Korea, California), primarily due to inefficiency. There is a lot of variation between states of the US, with the 10 most efficient states being as efficient as other nations, but the the rest of the states being horribly inefficient. There is a far correlation between being a blue state and being efficient, and most red states of inefficient. This can be traced to fairly straight-forward policies, regulations, and incentives that increase efficiency in the blue states. It is a shame we cannot simply adopt California's electricity policies, regulations, and incentives at the Federal level; it would almost halve our electricity consumption while improving our quality of life.

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