Women of Afghanistan: Rethink Afghanistan, Part 5

Rethink Afghanistan, pt. 5, directed by Robert Greenwald of Brave New Films, covers women’s issues.

Recent news on this front:

On Saturday it became clear that fighting on Friday between NATO and Taliban guerrillas left some 30 civilians dead, including women and children, when they were caught in the crossfire.

Gayle Tzemach Lemmon asks of President Hamid Karzai’s attempt to reconcile with the Taliban, Will Afghan women’s rights be bargained away?

Aware of these fears, earlier this week in Kabul, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton pledged that she will stand by Afghan women. She stressed that women’s NGOs will have an important role in post-conflict Afghanistan, basing her view on her experience with other post-conflict societies. Presumably she was implying a pledge to throw some US AID development money to local women’s groups.

Carla Koppell argues that Afghan women are agents playing an active role in taking the country forward, and should not be seen simply as victims.

Even in the northern, relatively calm Badakhshan Province, clerics are demanding that women not go out of the house unaccompanied.

And in the capital of that province, Mazar-i Sharif, previously among the more secure and advanced Afghan cities, women are increasingly afraid to go out alone or unveiled because of a Taliban resurgence in the north.

4 Responses

  1. “Aware of these fears, earlier this week in Kabul, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton pledged that she will stand by Afghan women.”

    I am neither a woman, nor from Afghanistan – but given the behavior of the government so far, I would ask what have you done for me? rather than pay any attention to what promises you make.

  2. “On Saturday it became clear that fighting on Friday between NATO and Taliban guerrillas left some 30 civilians dead, including women and children, when they were caught in the crossfire.”
    They were bombed, from the air! What kind of ‘crossfire’ is that?
    It seems very likely, (a) that this is just one more massacre of innocent civilians, (b) that, once again, the ‘Taliban’ are a more reliable and honest source of information than NATO.

  3. Afghan women and children are supposed to be protected from these conflicts. It’s just so sad that nothing has been to ensure their safety from crossfires in cases of fightings.

  4. Afghan women ask USA occupation force to go home, and to stop supporting warlords who are not less misogynistic than Taliban. RAWA is a voice of Afghan women, not Hillary Clinton. And, incidentally, without USA occupation, their would be NO “crossfire” to mass-murder Afghanistan civilians. Afghans are able to manage their own problems – no less than Americans.

    And, if USA are SO interested in Afghan women’s rights, why they founded Al-Qaida back then, when in Afghanistan there was the most women-rights friendly government? Because the gov in question was also USSR-backed, of course. So much for women’s rights….

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