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Total number of comments: 3 (since 2014-06-06 06:18:50)

Nicholas M

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  • Neo-Zangid State erases Syria-Iraq Border, cuts Hizbullah off from Iran
  • Facial Hair, Patriotism and the Enemy in American History
    • I've read that beards became popular in the 19th century for religious reasons, because it was how Americans imagined Old Testament prophets must have looked. On the other hand moustaches came to symbolize the military, with many officers having a moustache and no beard. Then there were religious, pacifist minorities like the Amish, who wanted to affirm their religiosity while rejecting anything militaristic, and that is why they grew beards with no moustaches.

    • That all depends on which era you are talking about. Through the 4th century, beards were certainly de rigeur for all Greek men. There was even a standard phrase "beardless youth" to refer to a young man who hadn't yet grown his beard (or to Apollo). Lacking facial hair was more of a Roman trait than a Greek one. And when Rome conquered Greece and became somewhat Hellenized, beards came into fashion for those who wanted to present themselves as sophisticated and Greek, just as remaining clean-shaven communicated to others that you rejected Greek cultural influence. Of course, after being conquered by Rome, any Greeks who wanted to have influence in Rome would have made sure they were clean shaven and spoke Latin. But the Greeks were definitely a bearded people, by and large.

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