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Total number of comments: 167 (since 2013-11-28 14:42:50)


Showing comments 167 - 101

  • Why did Turkey dare shoot down a Russian Plane? The Proxy War in Syria
    • Putin won't do anything stupid as he hasn't got a strong position. The present campaign of bombing rebels is obviously deeply unsettling to Turkey and NATO yet they can't directly oppose it, especially after the Paris bombing and more anti-Muslim feeling. The loss of a plane and a pilot can be accepted.
      The Russians will be hitting the Turkmans hard but will be wary of the border.

    • Why did Turkey dare shoot down a Russian Plane?

      The same reason Serbia faced down Austro-Hungary in1914. It is backed by an alliance that will get dragged into a war in spite of reckless and provocative behaviour by a minor state.
      A couple of years after 1914 and twenty thousand Englishmen are machine gunned down in a single day. NATO better be careful where Turkey is taking them.

  • Saudi Arabia: Poet Sentenced to Death for Apostasy
    • Saudi. The Islamic State with the Western stamp of approval.
      Maybe DAESH should start funneling oil money to Western leaders.

  • 'Very Soon' US forces will Arrive in Syria; Russia bombs near Turkey
    • The latest AFP report has strikes targeting 283 fuel tankers that were being used to transport oil to help fund the Islamic State group in eastern Syria, between Al Hasakah and Dayr Az Zawr in the east.

      Hundreds of oil tankers destroyed in a week and officials do not disclose their destination? Is the funding of ISIS through oil sales too embarrassing to mention publicly? If it is indeed the Syrian regime supporting ISIS , why aren't the US providing drone images and details of their double dealing?

      I note Al Hasakah is only 80 km from the Turkish border.

  • "For Paris" on Russian Missiles hitting Syria as ISIL Oil Facilities Targeted
    • No one is questioning the accuracy of American missiles. Yet if there were 500 gasoline trucks still smuggling after more than a year of Western bombing, the seriousness of Western intent must be questioned.

  • Kurdish Fighters cut Road between ISIL centers of Raqqa and Mosul
    • Maybe. Or the coalition could have seen the ISIL vehicles heading to Palmyra and ignored them because the Syrian regime held Palmyra. The coalition goal is two fold - defeat of ISIS, overthrow of Assad. Attacking ISIL could sometimes be defending the Syrian army - was this a reason why Palmyra fell?

    • Seeeing that Kurdish column rolling along a highway shows how vulnerable an attacking or reinforcing force would be to an airstrike. Yet ISIS have been driving up and down those roads for nearly a year and a half. How did they manage that?

      Now the road has been cut. After nearly 18 months? Finally some progress from the coalition.

      Surely nothing to do with the Russian involvement and Syrian army advances?

  • What Obama should tell Netanyahu this Week (But won't)
    • "since Britain launched the War of 1812 "
      Isn't that a bit like saying "since Iraq launched the War of 2003"?
      A leopard never changes its spots.

  • Abbas submits further files on Israeli Crimes to Int'l Criminal Court
    • If New Zealand has indeed put up such a resolution in the Security Council, they are puppets for a nation which does not want to put it forward themselves.

  • Iran's Attendance at Syria talks in Vienna marks its Emergence as Regional Power
    • Certainly barrel-bombing civilian neighborhoods is reprehensible.

      But isn't there an element of hypocrisy given the Allied bombing of World War 2? The intention in mass bombing attacks was to slaughter as many civilians as possible. First conventional bombing to break open houses, break water mains and hinder firefighters followed by incendiaries to burn to death or suffocate whole neighbourhoods. Then nuclear weapons dropped on cities - with death tolls of over a 100 000 in single attacks.

      Does the passage of time mean these are to regarded now as legitimate war time actions? The West seems to have decided actions far less intentional and deadly than their own bombing are war crimes while their own aging veterans are still heroes.

  • Senior National Security Advisers urge Obama to put Spec Ops Troops close to ISIL Front
    • The US has decided to bomb Syria without an invitation or a Security Council Resolution. That makes it as illegal under international law as the Iraq invasion.

      The Syrians found themselves in the same positon as anyone who finds their home invaded by armed thugs - best to acquiesce to their presence lest you further irritate them Especially if some factions amongst the thugs are openly advocating shooting the homeowner.

      The Russians are there now - if the foreign minister reversed his blessing, would the Western coalition obediently withdraw?

      As for the special ops - the press after initial scathing remarks on Russian military ineptitude have now gone quiet. Could it be the pressure is on the US to match Russian success?

  • Is Russia's offer of Parliamentary Elections in Syria Serious?
    • If you can’t have real elections in the middle of a civil war the Western plan shows another flaw in insisting Assad must go. He can only be replaced by someone appointed to the leadership and needs Assad to voluntarily step down..

      So far the West has yet to nominate a new Syrian leader. Perhaps Putin should put the cat amongst the pigeons again by suggesting one.

  • Al-Qaeda in Syria Leader: Kill Alawite Minority, Russians; Christians fear West Backs Him
    • The main stream media has yet to understand the implications of the map. There are no moderate forces in Syria. The US can find only a handful of Syrians to train and they are completely incapable of putting their trainees into any part of Syria where they can work with other groups. Instead each group of US trained fighters has either been attacked or had their weapons stripped from them.

      The question our leaders need to be asked:
      Why are we arming al-Qaeda?
      What will happen when our supported jihadists gain power over millions of 'heretics'?

  • Does Obama have a Syria Strategy? Putin Does.
    • He will continue to bomb Daesh targets in Syria, even though these aerial raids appear to have produced no results.
      Actually not just the US. Also Australia, France, Canada, and the UK. Together they must have hundreds if not thousands of planes and helicopters which can strike anywhere with pinpoint accuracy. Not to mention satellites and drones which can scrutinise every square inch of DAESH territory. And they have been going at it since June last year, 16 months now. Yet ISIL does not appear to be defeated.
      I remember the 'convey of death' when Iraqi troops retreated from Kuwait. The devastation airpower can inflict on a column on a desert road is incredible. Yet ISIL are still roaming Syria and conquering new areas.
      I am starting to wonder the unthinkable - does the US have a strategy of inflicting minimal damage on ISIL? One possible reason is the end result of morale shattering strikes on ISIL fighters and the collapse of ISIL. The survivors would probably continue the fight by merging with the 'moderates' and making themselves immune to airstrikes. This would push existing rebel forces towards a more extreme and violent form of resistance.
      So does the West really want to contain IS rather than destroy them? is it cynical to wonder if the results of the bombing are exactly as planned?

    • Obama's strategy is to appear as if he is doing something while accomplishing nothing. Bombing ISIL, training moderates, supporting the Kurds, all are ineffective because they are half-hearted PR exercises with no real goal.

      That is what a "world leader" is bound to do - pontificate and take some action at the beginning of every mess even if the situation is far from clear. Now a regime change would be literally out of Assad's frying pan into the jihadi fire.

      Putin was under no pressure and waited over four years before striking. If Putin had moved sooner he would have faced enormous pressure but now he has a free hand because of perceived Western failure.

      The only question - will Putin be allowed to roll back the rebels and allow a relatively stable Assad dominated heartland to be set up? Or will the west, out of wounded pride, attempt to sabotage Putin and escalate the war?

  • What is Russia's Strategy in Syria & Why does Egypt Approve?
    • The more pertinent question - what is the US strategy in Syria?

      After more than four years an overt strategy of finding and arming moderates has been abandoned. US support for the Kurds has been undermined by their NATO ally Turkey. ISIL is getting support from somewhere but US intelligence has not – or will not – reveal how they sell oil or how they support a population of several million. Although they have bombed ISIL for almost a year, it has not stopped ISIL from more conquests.

      The 'covert' CIA strategy is now becoming more clearer as the Russians bomb CIA supplied groups. Since the US can not seem to find any moderates to arm openly, it has been handing out lethal weapons to shadowy groups. Who these groups are and what these groups will do with this weapons is not being discussed openly.

      What makes US intervention in Syria possibly worse than the Iraq invasion is its ineffectiveness, a war on which has dragged for more than four years with no end in sight. And the Syrian intervention is certainly no more legal than Bush's attack on Iraq.

      Now the strategy seems to be to allow rebel groups to call in US air-strikes. ISIL, Syrian regime troops, other opposition groups, a village full of heretics, a hospital – just name it and the US will blow it up. And we haven't even started talking about what happens when American policy finally succeeds - the fall of Damascus.

  • No, Donald Trump, Mideast wouldn't be more Stable under Saddam & other Dictators
    • After last weeks shooting Trump showed he was a fan of the 70's vigilante movie "Deathwish" where Bronson turns from a victim of a mugging into a one man death squad targetting anyone who resembled his racist profile of a mugger.
      By calling the Iraq invasion illegal but nevertheless a good thing you are also taking the position of a vigilante, someone who is judge, jury and executioner. tyrants are propped up, some are bombed, new tyrants take their place but the decision is always made by the vigilante.
      I believe your analysis does not take into account the chaos vigilante action has caused. Case in point: Syria is stalemated because the opposition is holding out for outside vigilante intervention. A political settlement will not be reached if the rebels think they can march into Damascus behind US tanks.

  • Why Obama and Putin are Both Wrong on Syria
    • Any nation which fights two enemies simultaneously has to decide which one has to be dealt with first. Would you judge America's efforts in 1942 to concentrate on Japan rather than genocidal Nazi Germany as less than valiant?

  • Syria: Is Bashar al-Assad winning the Diplomatic War? Rebels Fret
    • On chemical weapons and again in Syria the former KGB man has had his way. All he had to do was sit back until Western plans became obvious failures and step in with the only alternative.

  • Are U.S., Russian Arms Supplies to Iraq, Syria a Blessing to Rebel Groups?
    • And anothe little snippet from the same article.
      "Amnesty International said that in 2004 and 2005 more than 350,000 AK-47 rifles and similar weapons were taken out of Bosnia and Serbia, for use in Iraq, by private contractors working for the Pentagon and with the approval of NATO and European security forces in Bosnia. "
      link to

    • According to the Washington Post in an article on Monday, August 6, 2007, the Pentagon has lost track of about 190,000 AK-47 assault rifles and pistols given to Iraqi security forces in 2004 and 2005. These were presumably from Iraqi stocks and issued when security training was led by Gen. David H. Petraeus.
      The responsibility for the proliferation of AK-47s by rebel forces does not always lead back to Russia.

  • Majority of Palestinians lose hope in 2 States, Await Israeli Ethnic Cleansing
    • Can you imagine in 10 years time a delegation of West Bank residents turning up at an AIPAC conference claiming to be Israelis and asking for help in getting their civil rights in a democratic Israel?

    • If an independent Palestinian can not be achieved, the alternative is the annexation of the Palestinian territories. The status of those living in the new territories would then have to be decided. Would they be citizens with equal rights or would apartheid have to be imposed?
      If Palestinians declared Israel's actions have made a two state solution impossible and demanded outright annexation and full civil rights, Israel would be put in a very difficult situation. The pressure would be on them to deal with several million Arabs living under occupation who demand a resolution to the stalemate. Not so easy for the US either if the 'pie in the sky' solution disappears and the US is defending Jim Crow policies in its ally.

  • Trump Pledges to "Look into" Paranoid Charges of Muslim-American Terror camps
    • The US is starting to remind me of Weimar Germany. After a lost war and economic turmoil, a demagogue blames all the nation's troubles on foreign plots and ethnic minorities. Against a backdrop of flags and reverence for the armed forces the claim is made the nation can be made great again. All it will take is resolute action to force other nations to accept their place in the world.

  • Pope Francis' call to host Refugees contrasts w/ anti-Immigrant US "Religious Right"
    • The Pope has always been one of the leading voices against birth control. Given the youthful and expanding population of the Middle East, the frustration of Arab youth as they enter stagnant economies and the fracture of societies based on religion, it appears the Pope is amongst those causing rather fixing the problem.

  • ISIL beheaded Dozens in Palmyra, but how Strategic is the City?
    • At least Assad has proved capable of running a multi-ethnic state in the past. Assad has certainly been brutal but states can be brutal in times of war. Deliberate targeting of civilians which killed tens of thousands in one night using bombing firestorms and nuclear strikes comes to mind and the men who did this are regarded as heroes.

    • I wandered around Palmyra a decade ago in a country where people were more friendly than anywhere else I have visited. I still remember being invited to homes and wonder where these people are now.
      Palmyra is a place of great historical and cultural significance, The Roman and Greek influenced architecture is simply stunning and it would be an enormous loss to the world if these sites. over 2000 years old, are damaged or destroyed.

  • Syria: What if Turkey and Saudi Arabia install al-Qaeda in Damascus?
    • So this war is heading for two decades? (anything that happens in Syria for the next 10 or 15 years is likely to be horrible). At what point do we decide on the lesser of the evils to stop the killing? Now or a decade down the track?

  • Pakistan as Hong Kong West: China's New Silk Road & US Failure
    • A 3000 km enormously expensive railway line running through mountains and areas under the control of separatist forces fighting the Pakistani governments. A good plan?

      What will go back and forth on this railway? Neither Urumqi nor Karachi are renowned for their international trade

      A ship from Shanghai can now deliver 20,000 20 foot containers in a single sailing. How long would a train have to be to deliver that quantity?

  • As US Consulate in Irbil. Iraq, is Bombed, can US still do Diplomacy in ME?
    • It is true tha US diplomats are finding it more difficult to carry out the work of the US government due to the increasing violence and instability of the Middle East.

      However, given the US has been the foreign power dominating diplomatic effects for decades in a region now moving into a series of civil wars, I am not convinced less opportunities to meddle is a bad thing.

  • Juan Cole: Syria, Yemen Conflicts only seem to be about Sunni-Shiite from 30,000 Feet
    • Can you explain why the US is aiding the Saudis in bombing a movement of the Zaidi Shiite community in Northern Yemen in their civil war?

  • President Hillary Clinton's Middle East Policy: Interventions, Wars, More of Same
    • The difference between Thatcher, Merkel, Guillard and Clark is they reached leadership of Western democracies alone and on their own merits.

      There is a dynastic model of women leadership found in nations which is not associated with the country's record of women's rights.

      The Great Democracy is following in the path of Pakistan and Bangladesh in electing the wife of a former President who can not stand for himself.

    • It is not clear that she would actually do anything about continued illegal Israeli squatting on Occupied Palestinian land.

      Pretty clear to me. She will make mild statements of condemnation while vetoing and undermining every meaningful international action taken through the UN or ICC opposing the squatting.

  • As Iran talks Progress, US, Iran forces cooperate in taking Tikrit
    • I think this answers a question I had a few days ago - why when Saudi Arabia alone has 300 modern combat aircraft within range of Tikrit does the USAF have to be the one to drop the bombs?
      The answer appears to be the Saudis regard a Shiite takeover of a majority Sunni town as being a greater evil than Daesh control of several million civilians. The absence of other Mideast air-forces - allies supported and supplied by the US - shows the Saudis are not alone in siding with Sunnis, however vicious their behaviour against Shiites and others judged not sufficiently pure.
      So are the Daesh , regarded as the most evil force in the world in the West, considered by Mideast states as the lesser of the two evils when compared to Iraq regaining control over Tikrit?

  • A Game-Changer in Syrian War? al-Qaeda-led Factions take Idlib
    • The situation in Syria appears to be a stalemate. The Syrian regime can not crush the rebels and the rebels can not overthrow the regime. A couple of years ago it seemed likely the US would commit a Libyan-style intervention but now it is bombing Assad's enemies who are dominated by those who hate Western values.
      As support comes in on both sides, this conflict could last indefinitely. Why then is a loss of a remote provincial city a game changer?

  • Washington's 2 Air Wars: alongside Iran in Iraq, Saudis in Yemen
    • There is something I am not understanding here.
      Depending on the source, Saudi Arabia is either the third or fourth nation ranked by military spending, ahead of Israel, France or the UK, with 300 modern strike aircraft. The Gulf states, Egypt, Jordan and Iran all have strike aircraft so the total airforce available to bomb ISIS forces must be near 500 combat aircraft.
      With all those planes available in the region why then does the US have to be involved? If these states are truly worried about the threat wouldn't even 10% of their strike force be more than enough to bomb Tikrit?
      One of those situations where what is said does not match up with the actions.

  • Mideast Reacts with Horror: "Israel has elected Extremism and Racism"
    • Sure he will backtrack - he already has. Question is can any peace talks resume when an Israeli PM has rejected the establishment of a Palestinian state under his term of office no matter what concessions are made?
      If there is no longer a path to peace or even the semblance of an Israeli partner how can the recognition of Palestine be vetoed in the UN?

    • The Arab press should be pleased. A left wing coalition would restart peace talks with the US at an intermediary - a peace process which has gone on since at least the days of Nixon and Kissinger with the only tangible result being the establishment of a virtual bantustan and the flooding of settlers into the West Bank.
      Netanyahu is a liar. He claims to support a two party state and then no Palestinian state depending on his audience. The argument against international sanctions - the peace process must not be derailed - has been nullified because there is no peace process without a willing Israeli partner.
      The rift with Obama gives the Palestinians the green light to push ahead with all speed in international law at a time when the blocking actions ot the US are its lowest.

  • 5 Surprising Ways Iran is better than Israel
    • As well as refusing to sign the NPT, Israel is also one of the handful of countries who have not ratified the Chemical Weapons Convention. Unlike Iran or even Syria.

  • The Latest Blow to Israeli-Palestinian Peace
    • So the US has again blocked the peace progress. Surprised? The way forward is the UN, the ICC and EU sanctions. Time for the Palestinians to treat the US as irrelevant.

  • Amazing Green Cars at the 2015 Detroit Auto Show
    • Of course instead of sitting in a parking lot, the empty car will be driving around to pick you up. That will increase miles driven, no? Once you can sit back and relax, why not live 50 miles out of town or let the car drive you to Los Vegas for the weekend? Especially since most of your fuel is coming from your rooftop panel.
      Make something cheaper and more convenient and more is consumed. Electric self driving cars are going to cause massive congestion problems.

  • Guns: Americans more likely to be Shot by Toddler than by Terrorist
    • Most foreigners saw Bush as an aberration, a man out of his depth and caught by bad decisions. Our problem is we were all so excited about Obama awe even gave him a Nobel Peace Prize just for not being GWB. Now we are facing facts. Bush was not the problem and replacing him with what looked like a liberal has resulted in very little change in foreign policy.
      Sure you are out of Iraq and Afghanistan but they were military defeats more than planned withdrawals and were set in motion by Bush.
      Guantanamo. Drone warfare. NSA spying. Total and unconditional support for Israel. All Obama's work.

  • What would Happen if the Int'l Criminal Court Indicted Israel's Netanyahu?
    • In deciding to prosecute any Israeli official, the pressure placed on the ICC would be enormous and would be orchestrated by the US. The US have successfully blocked any sanctions on their ally for decades so I am expecting very little from the ICC.

  • President Obama's Biggest Mideast Policy Challenges, 2015
    • The US has been the dominant foreign power in the Middle East for decades. It provides enormous amounts of military assistance, propping up the armies of despots and providing everything from attack helicopters to cluster bombs. It is the only foreign power to station troops in the regime and the only significant foreign naval presence. It stands completely behind Israel and blocks any action that is not first decided by Tel Aviv. It invaded one Arab country and bombs and drone strike many more. It applies sanctions to some countries and arms and equips groups which seek to overthrow governments.
      After decades of the 'Carter Doctrine' the Mideast is in worse shape than ever. And the solution? Is it really more US meddling?

  • Palestinians ready next Move as UNSC rejects end of Occupation
    • Did Abbas try to fail? Five security members are replaced within a day or two of the vote and they may have been more sympathetic. Or is he leaving the option for a second attempt with the 2015 Security Council?

  • Baathist Riposte: How the Regime Came back in the Syrian Civil War in 2014
    • The Syrian National Coalition may have been recognized by most of the world, including the U.S. but if its constituent brigades defected to the Islamic Front because the US would not bomb Syria or give it MANPADS suggests Syrian allegiance to the SNC was very low. Once it was seen it could not gather Western support, this front organisation was abandoned and the rebels went back to the militas which truly shared their goals.

    • So where is the plan?
      The battle is now between Baathists and extremists. Bombing the extremists helps the Baathists - so does the West destroy the extremists to allow a regime takeover of territory? Seems extremely doubtful the moderates can step up.
      A possibility is a full-scale US invasion and occupation - although given the consequences of the Iraq fiasco, that seems unlikely to succeed.
      The worst plan may be to continue with the idea of arming the opponents and giving them the hope of eventual intervention. That may drag this war on for years or decades and it must be faced that a civil war like this is far worse than a Baathist dictatorship.

  • Israel Econ. Minister's West Bank annexation plan a wake up call for the West
    • I would be interested to see Bennet explain the difference between his vison of subservient Palestinians living in an area "short of a state" and the Bantustans planned by apartheid era South Africa.

  • The end of National Sovereignty in the Middle East? Iraqi Kurdistan sends troops into Syria
  • Defying Turkey, US airdrops arms to Kobane Kurds
    • When you have three or more sides in a conflict there is usually a temporary understanding as to who is the main enemy and who is to be left alone or become secret allies, however messy or immoral the situation. The US is now helping Assad and the Turks are using ISIS to keep the Kurds down so NATO allies are now effectively opposing each other.

  • Turkey bargaining with base for US, wants no-fly zone in Syria
    • Of course the US has another ally in the region just as close as Turkey is to the ISIS forces. It also has airbases suitable for bombers and an advanced air-force and its troops face ISIS at the Golan Heights.
      Of course this ally can not get involved as it would inflame the situation- which rather begs the question of why spend billions on an ally which will not and can not help you?

  • The Last Days of Kobani Loom as ISIL Closes in on Syrian Kurds with Murder on its Mind
    • So basically the Americans don't trust the Kurds enough to give them a laser pointer - even though a Kurdish city is about to be massacred. Their Nato ally the Turks are sitting a kilometer away from the same city and watching developments because they don't want to help Kurdish separatism. The Iraqi army has yet to make progress because much of their equipment has been stolen by their corrupt officers and sold - probably to ISIS. Iraqi politicians are too busy bickering to unite in responding to the threat and Shi'ite militias are killing Sunni civilians with more enthusiasm than confronting ISIS. Iran, Hezbollah, and Assad's Syria have effective fighters and hate ISIS but can't be in the same fight. A force of only a few thousand fighters have conquered half of Iraq and Syria and hold several million inhabitants under their control, and are pushing back Kurdish peshmerga while absorbing Western airstrikes. The Free Syrian Army appears to be totally missing but if we put in 1% of the billions spent on the Iraqi army , they will sort this whole mess out.
      What has Bush/Obama dragged the US into?

  • The Yasukuni Shuffle: China and Japan duke it out via T.V. Serials on the Wrongs of WW II
    • On May 5 1985 President Reagan also took a stroll in a park. The park was Bitburg Military Cemetery which contains the graves of 49 soldiers of the Waffen-ss. No American President has ever repeated this mistake as it was seen as siding with the perpetrators of WWII mass killings.
      Yet the Japanese Leaders persist in visiting a shrine to war dead which contains war criminals who organized massacres. Jewish and other leaders were justifiably outraged by Reagan's visit - why can't the Chinese show the same reaction?

  • Palestine goes to UN Security Council to Demand Israeli Withdrawal by 2016
    • Depressingly accurate. After the drawnout Kerry peace progress, Palestinians head for the UN even though the US must have privately told them they will veto any progress. Then in a couple of years - maybe - the ICC. All the hallmarks of timewasting.

  • US strikes ISIL oil fields in Quest to Defund it: But will it Replace oil with Fracking?
    • ISIS are landlocked so the oil must be passing through either Iraq, Iran, Turkey. Israel or regime controlled Syria. Does the extensive US spy network- who appear to know the refineries location, output and selling price - have any idea who is buying this oil and helping to fund ISIS? Or is disclosing the allies of ISIS politically sensitive?

  • Shock & Awe In Syria: It never Works
  • Elon Musk's Nevada Gigafactory may Save the World
    • The question that needs asking - how long is the life of a battery? Most battery powered appliances - notebooks. mobile phones - would never make the five year mark and their battery life drops until many laptops become only useful plugged in.
      An internal combustion engine lasts decades and does not decrease in efficiency. Any comparison of costs has to include costs of replacing batteries and since the range of a fresh battery is still marginal, any drop in performance is going to have an impact.
      Incidentally, Chinese cities ban motorbikes and the streets are full of e-bikes. I suspect this will be the driver for electric vehicles as 100 million cheap electic scooters outweigh a few thousand exotic sportscars.

  • Israel's Gaza Campaign Endangers US Security: Why Obama & Kerry are Furious
    • Just one question - is the US supply chain replacing Israeli munitions as fast as they are being dropped on civilians?
      That would be a more accurate way of knowing the degree of pressure being applied to stop this killing than any public statement.

  • As a Sakharov laureate and a mother, I call on the EU to help save Palestinians – and Israel
    • The US has claimed a sole leadership role in this conflict since the days of Nixon and Kissinger. At the same time it has supplied weapons and vetoed every resolution criticising Israel. Even when it requests a halt to settlements it is publicly ignored. A reasonable question is - what has US leadership acheived for Palestine?
      Perhaps after 40 years of failure it is time to step aside.

  • Gaza War Devastates Israeli Tourism Revenue, Points to Fragile Apartheid Future
    • I had thought the rockets were a sign of desperation, an ineffective and counterproductive activity. Yet these rockets have sent millions of Israelis rushing to bomb shelters, forced the mobilisation of tens of thousands of troops, and created massive disruption to the Israeli economy - the closing of the airport being the latest indication.

      In addition Israeli troops have had little option but close quarters urban fighting in a crowded city - the very worst option for a technologically advanced army. In a city their overwhelming firepower creates civilian casualties while they blunder into prepared defences.

      The paradox of the Gaza missiles is their ineffectiveness in killing is their strength. Netanyahu has not a single "telegenic dead Israeli child" to display to the world while the world media displays picture after picture of dead Palestinian children. Yet he can not ignore the missiles.

      No wonder the Israelis are bemoaning the failed ceasefire. and Kerry is keen to intervene. Hamas can string the Israelis along for weeks to come - or step up their resistance against the Israeli stranglehold at any time.

  • Gaza: Netanyahu, Goaded by Israeli Far Right, Risks Breaking Int'l Law
    • No significance in breaking international law at all. The US will always protect Israel, both at the UN and through pressure on allies. The US protects a state which conquered territory in a pre-emptive war, which occupies the territory without granting citizenship, denies the right to return, plants settlements to squeeze out the landowners and bombs the unhappy occupied masses. Perhaps the ultimate cynic Putin can now agree with the US it that this is an acceptable policy and apply the same tactics to Ukraine - for a start.

  • Israel's search for missing settlers shines light on depth of the West Bank’s occupation
    • Looks like the only sensible option is to abandon the idea of Palestine as a separate state. Israel now stretches to the River Jordan. Recognise facts on the ground.
      Stop calling yourselves Palestinians. Call yourself Israelis and demand your full civil rights of a vote, family unification, free access to anywhere to live in Israel and an end to race based discrimination. The bantu state of Palestine serves only Israeli interests.

  • The seven people who need to STFU about Iraq right now
    • "In direct refutation of this [Glen's] portrayal," Powell concluded, "is the fact that relations between Americal soldiers and the Vietnamese people are excellent."
      Major Colin Powell, Vietnam 1968, in response to allegations of a massacre in My Lai by the Americl Division.
      How can you put a blot on a record like that?

  • Egypt, Syria, Libya . . . . What is the Appeal of Phoney Elections in the Middle East?
    • Being unable to create a parliamentary majority as in Iraq is certainly a problem but it is a little hard to blame it on the election. The result presumably mirrors deep divisions in the country and an electoral system which creates a majority government from one minority would not be an improvement.

      A vote of no-confidence, followed by fresh elections - repeated if necessary - may be the only way forward if voters tire of obstruction and intransigence from a party. With the biggest party only getting 25% of the vote, surely many different coalitions are possible.

  • Georgia Courthouse is shot up by Sovereign Citizen after GOP backs Bundy, Open Carry
    • I think the argument the US has so many of these incidents due to lax gun control is only partly true. Many other nations also have high gun ownership, although very few would have as many handguns or assault rifles.
      Something in the way Americans relate to and treat each other seems also to blame. In reading blog comments all over the web elements of mean-spiritness, assertions of unbridled rights, violent threats, and contempt for others appear disproportionally from those in the US - and not only from the right.

  • The NSA Effect: China tells its banks to remove IBM servers as Spyware
    • A little hard to take it seriously though. Software is a bigger spyware risk than hardware and Windows is still widely used in China. Back in 1999, Red Flag Linux was touted by the Chinese Government as their replacement for foreign controlled operating systems. Red Flag was wound up early this year with unpaid wages although a usable alternative could easily have been built giving the state of Linux and Chinese resources.

  • Second Libyan Upheaval, this Time Against Political Islam, Extremist Militias
    • NATO mainly bombed some regime arms depots and a few armored convoys.

      NATO launched over 26 000 sorties. Not every aircraft flight was a bombing mission but multiple targets can be hit by a single mission. That figure doeds not include drone strikes or ship launched missiles. They must be a remarkably inefficient military force if all that was required for arms depots and a few convoys.

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